Cocktail of the Hour: the Daiquiri

c/o Angel Negrin In much of the restaurant industry, "blender" is a curse word. They are not only loud, breakable and time-consuming, but also pretty much useless in classic recipes. Believe it or not, one such drink is the daiquiri.

Named for a Cuban beach, this beverage's root date back to before the Spanish-American War. From there, its history gets hazy. Some sources suggest that the classic daiquiri's proportions mimic the daily rations of rum, citrus and sugar given to British sailors, suggesting that their grog was a less refined version of this cocktail. Other stories suggest that, since sugar cane and lime are indigenous to Cuba, that it was a combination of available resources.

What we know for sure is that this drink -- and many of its many variations -- has served up inspiration for writers and artists of all kinds. Hemingway himself frequented Cuba's La Florida (the self-proclaimed "Cradle of the Daiquiri"), and his drink made it into 1937's Bar La Florida Cocktails as "The Henmiway Special." Boasting translation skills on par with its spelling, this book is entertaining, but probably not the most reliable source.

After that point, the daiquiri became popular again in the 1940s and 1970s. Like many other cocktails, its most recognizable present form is actually a re-imagining from the 1960s/70s/80s that ratcheted up its sugar content to appeal to the public palate. Its most classic form, however, is a humble beverage that balances tart with sweet. Mix one up today to find out why it's inspired countless variations.


2 oz white rum

1 oz lime juice

1 oz simple syrup

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and shake for 10-12 seconds or until cooled through. Strain and serve straight up.